MadMarriage

MCU + the slam

brambledei:

fannishflightsoffancy:

you (nearly) sunk my battleship.

there are actual tear in my eyes

brambledei:

fannishflightsoffancy:

you (nearly) sunk my battleship.

there are actual tear in my eyes

fluffmugger:

beckyblackbooks:

timid-spirit:

uncloudedjoy:

iamfitzwilliamdarcy:

catie-does-things:

sageofmagic:

memegrandpa:

helbows:

Introducing the Social Intelligence Test! From what I can tell, it’s sponsored by Harvard and it’s rather interesting. The basis is you look at pictures of people going through different emotions and decide what emotion they’re feeling. The trick is, you can only see their eyes.

How well can you read people? I never thought I was good at it, but I scored rather high on this test. It was a very interesting experience! I highly recommend taking this!

13 out of 36…

28 out of 36

Very interesting. I got 31 out of 36.

22 out of 36 i am below average

24/36

 29 out of 36. I really didn’t think I’d do that well.

I got 31 out of 36, which surprised me, as lots of times I didn’t feel like I knew the answer. But I have slowly learned that on some tests when you think you are guessing it’s your unconscious at work, or your instincts, or whatever, so don’t fight it.

28. heh.

latinorebels:

No explanation needed.

latinorebels:

No explanation needed.

laughterkey:

vinkunwildflowerqueen:

reinedeboheme:

lexieloveyoulikeacupcake:

When Jack Warner was casting the movie My Fair Lady, Julie Andrews, who played the original Eliza Doolittle on Broadway, was overlook for the part, that was given to Audrey Hepburn.

That made her available to accept Mr. Disney’s invitation to play Mary Poppins.

At the 22nd Golden Globes, when she won the best actress award (she was up against Audrey for My Fair Lady), she had her sweet revenge.

how to shade, with class.

Julie Andrews is the queen of everything

Always reblog.

livelymorgue:

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

femburton:

i have literally watched this about 100 times since reblogging it the first time 


(credit for the space gif)

(credit for the space gif)

Hunger, a poet once said, is the most important thing we know, the first lesson we learn. But hunger can be easily quieted down, easily satiated. There is another force, a different type of hunger, an unquenchable thirst that cannot be extinguished. It’s very existence is what defines us, what makes us human. That force is love.